Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-12-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hi, folks! I’ve got another round of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews) for you today, featuring two hearty summer salads and an oh-so chunky granola that’s sure to start your morning off right. Oh, and of course lots of important news about why we should look critically at human rights rhetoric, an overview of the differences between sex and gender, and a compilation of Black vegans who are debunking the claim that “veganism is white.” Let’s get to it!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Green Bean & Purple Potato Salad
Via Love and Lemons

Photo via Jeanine Donofrio.

Photo via Jeanine Donofrio.

Sweet

Clumpy Banana & Almond Butter Granola with Cacao Nibs
Via Oh, Ladycakes

Photo via Ashlae at Oh, Ladycakes.

Photo via Ashlae at Oh, Ladycakes.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Best Ever Warm Summer Rice
Via Blissful Basil

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Must-Read Article(s)

Why Human Rights Don’t Work for Me
By Lydia Lopez

Eleanor Roosevelt and The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Photo via The Feminist Wire.

Eleanor Roosevelt and The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Photo via The Feminist Wire.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

What’s the Difference Between Sex and Gender?
By Mariana Wantanabe

Photo via Everyday Feminism.

Photo via Everyday Feminism.

Book Recommendation Awesome Projects You Should Totally Check Out

#BlackVegansRock: 100 Black Vegans to Check Out
By Aph Ko at Striving with Systems

Photo via Aph Ko.

Photo via Aph Ko.

In solidarity, Ali.

Veganism & Bodily Autonomy

Can we talk about bodily autonomy for a hot sec? Because it’s a big reason why I advocate veganism.

Diana (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

Diana (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

So you and I and everyone around us each live in a body, and we all have different levels of comfort, safety, and ability that determine what we can do — both in the sense of being physically able to do it, and being emotionally okay with doing it — based on our different life experiences. And, if we hope to embody radical humility, then we have to understand others’ life experiences as legitimate and deserving of respect. Put two-and-two together: we as humans who strive for radical humility must respect the comfort, safety, and ability levels of the bodies of the people whose life experiences are different from our own.

That’s respecting bodily autonomy: each person’s ability to determine what they do or don’t do with their own body, as long as it does not infringe upon the bodily autonomy of others. It’s a pretty major feminist tenet. And although I would argue that it’s damn near impossible to enjoy full bodily autonomy under capitalism and state governance, I think that we can work together to ensure that we as a community contribute as little as possible to the social controls that infringe upon our ability to feel safe and comfortable in our own bodies.

Mister (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

Mister (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

That’s why consent is great and necessary, that’s why asking people before you hug them is super important, that’s why commenting on people’s size and shape is unacceptable…and that’s why I don’t eat other animals or their secretions. The body of a pig, cow, chicken, duck, lizard, or what-have-you does not belong to me, nor do any of the things that come out of their bodies (eggs, milk, etc.).

In some situations with other animals, it’s pretty clear whether or not they want me to be doing something with their bodies. For example, if Diana moseys up to me in the goat pasture at the sanctuary where I’m working this summer and starts nuzzling her head against my hand, I’m fairly confident that she’s asking me to pet her. Or if I enter Mister’s duck enclosure and he starts nipping at my legs, I’m definitely not going to bother him any more than necessary (like to stick his bowl of salad in there at dinnertime).

Sweet Pea (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

Sweet Pea (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

So unless Sweet Pea lays her egg, picks it up with her beak, and sets it in my hand, I’m not going to claim it as my own. Unless Beatrice rips off a piece of her own flesh, trots up to me and sets it at my feet, I’m sure as hell not going to take it. Otherwise, the lines of communication between me and other animals are not clear enough to ensure informed consent among all parties involved, so I’ll air on the side of caution and assume that they do not want me doing something with their bodies…including consuming it or what comes from it.

Moral of the story: please don’t do things to other people’s bodies unless they explicitly ask you to. That includes other animals. By taking this request to heart, we can work to support each other in feeling comfortable and safe in our own bodies, even when we cannot in the rest of the world.

Beatrice (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

Beatrice (Image via Heartland Farm Sanctuary)

In solidarity, Ali.


References

“I’ve been thinking about….” No, That’s not how Abortion is. 13 March 2014. Web. 6 June 2015.

Kate. “Bodily autonomy….” Vegan-Vulcan. 23 May 2014. Web. 6 June 2015.

Low, Hana. “Pro-choice is not anti-vegan.” Hana Low: Opening the Cages for Collective Liberation. 15 January 2015. Web. 6 June 2015.

Miss Pixie and Stuntiverse. “Consent culture (Vegan BDSM pt 2).” Ethical Kink. 23 March 2014. 6 June 2015.

—. “Power and privilege (Vegan BDSM pt 3).” Ethical Kink. 28 March 2014. 6 June 2015.

—. “Vegan BDSM.” Ethical Kink. 18 March 2014. Web. 6 June 2015.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-5-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hi, all, and welcome to yet another round of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)! Sorry about missing last week’s post; I was knee-deep in extra-large cardboard boxes and winter clothing to transfer into storage…hooray for moving back home for the summer! Now that I’m settled in Madison (living in another decades-old co-op & working at my local farmed animal sanctuary), I’m pleased to recommence the # NewsandChews party.

This one features two unpretentious yet show-stopping dishes–the first, appropriate for spring; the second, ideal for summer–as well as a luscious dessert with minimal ingredients and maximum satisfaction. Then, for stories, I’ll share some (I feel) important critiques on the manner in which media coverage has portrayed Caitlyn Jenner and her transition, and the issues that such coverage obscures. Plus, an adorably succinct animated vid on consent, and one of the most emotionally honest books I’ve ever read. Enjoy!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Caramelized Fennel on Herbed Polenta
Via 101 Cookbooks

herbed-polenta-recipe

Photo via Heidi Swanson.

Fennel will soon arrive at the farmers’ market, which means that tons of juicy, succulent, summery joy will enter into my life once more. And what better way to add to that joy than with creamy polenta, vibrant herbs, and a touch of ever-magical maple syrup? Just make sure to sub coconut oil for the ghee and vegan hard cheese like Treeline for the Pecorino, y’hear?

Sweet

Peanut Butter-Banana Cookie Dough Shake
Via Blissful Basil

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

I just wasn’t really aware that it was possible to fit this much sweet creamy deliciousness into one glass…

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Caponata Panzanella
Via The First Mess

Photo via Laura Wright.

Photo via Laura Wright.

Part of one of the last meals my Ferry housemates and I shared as a house, this panzanella is chock-full of juicy roasted vegetables, impeccably textured bread, and savory undertones of oregano. Make a big batch and enjoy it for the whole week.

Must-Read Article(s)

Commentary on Media Coverage of Caitlyn Jenner

Photo via Vanity Fair.

Photo via Vanity Fair.

Hooray for increased trans visibility and respectful (for the most part) recounting of Caitlyn Jenner’s story, but boo to the obscuring effect that media coverage of Caitlyn’s narrative has on the experiences of less privileged trans people. Below are three articles that delve into the details of this obscuring:

Do You Applaud Caitlyn Jenner Because She Is Brave, or Because She’s Pretty?
Via Meredith Talusan at The Guardian

Call Her Caitlyn But Then Let’s Move on to the Issues Affecting the Trans Community
Via Chase Strangio at Common Dreams

Revealing Caitlyn Jenner: My Thoughts on Media, Privilege, Healthcare Access & Glamour
Via Janet Mock

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Tea & Consent
Via Blue Seat Studios

Photo via Blue Seat Studios.

Photo via Blue Seat Studios.

I’m a bit late to the game on this video (though I totally would have shared it last week had I not been all in a tizzy with packing), but just in case some of ya’ll haven’t seen it yet, please enjoy this supremely coherent and simple explanation of consent, as told by stick figures with tea.

Book Recommendation

Fun Home
By Alison Bechdel

Photo via Publishers' Weekly.

Photo via Publishers’ Weekly.

Alison Bechdel‘s work — starting with her comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For and moving into her graphic novels — has been widely celebrated for a while now, even in the form of a Broadway play. And yet, it took me until last week to finally get my hands on her seminal text Fun Homeone of the most emotionally honest, relatable books I’ve encountered in a great while. Don’t be surprised if you finish this one in a single sitting.

In solidarity, Ali.

A Response to “Veganism is a Form of Disordered Eating”: Why the Vegan Community Needs to Take Accountability

Recently, I was interviewed for an academic publication that sought to debunk the myth that veganism constitutes a form of disordered eating. Having lived in a state of ongoing ED recovery for the past five years now — and having experienced veganism as a profound mechanism of healing — I emphatically support the work my interviewer was attempting to do. Indeed, as a proponent of veganism, I no longer understand animal flesh and secretions as food, so likening my veganism to an eating disorder would parallel someone being concerned about my eating habits because I wasn’t chowing down on my carpet.

During the interview, my interviewer asked whether or not I felt anger toward folks who mask eating disorders with vegan consumption habits, only to subsequently speak out against veganism for the struggles it caused them. The question stopped me. Of course I wasn’t angry at such folks — I was one of them, after all, and I couldn’t possibly feel animosity toward someone solely for their destructive internalization of Western false ideals of beauty and body. But I understood where the question was coming from: there has been much backlash in the vegan community against ED-provoked former vegans — a backlash that I believe targets the wrong entities.

Instead of blaming people who hide eating disorders behind vegan consumption habits for giving veganism a bad name, perhaps we should engage in a critical analysis of how we who support vegan consumption habits tend to construct veganism in discourse and practice in such a way as to prompt folks to use vegan eating as a mask for deeper destructive dynamics.

While as I mentioned above I completely support efforts to de-link veganism from eating disorders, I can totally grasp the tendency to connect the two, since for many — including myself while in the depths of my ED — vegan consumption habits can serve as a method of justification for refusing certain calorie-dense foods (even though there’s an animal-free version of basically any dish these days) or loading up one’s plate with veggies. This linkage, however, depends at least in part upon constructions of vegan consumption as “the healthiest diet,” which serves as one of the main arguments for adopting vegan eating habits among vegan activists.

In vegan health arguments, I can identify a number of problems that serve to lend vegan consumption to a masking of eating disorders.

For starters, vegan health arguments construe veganism as primarily a matter of food choice. They thus equate eating with morality–an equation that has played a large role in my own struggles with disordered eating. For example, if I ate something I perceived as unhealthy, failed to include a leafy green vegetable in one of my meals, or ate more than my body needed at any given moment, I would feel a profound sense of guilt and disgust with myself. I based my self-worth primarily on how, when, and what I ate, so eating became a major marker of how I perceived my morality.

I can also see this dynamic play out in health-oriented vegan circles, which tend to lean toward no-oil/soy-free/grain-free/low-fat/etc. diets and equate such supposedly “healthy” eating styles with morality. Indeed, a number of my colleagues have experienced backlash from such circles for publishing recipes perceived as “unhealthy,” receiving such ludicrous comments as “you’re not really vegan if you cook in such-and-such a way” (which is totally false unless that way in which you cook involves animal products). Veganism thus becomes a path by which to achieve the “purest” form of eating, which many forms of disordered eating also seek to do.

However, if we understand veganism as one among many attempts to question the default ideologies – in this case, speciesism – that infringe upon our ability to coexist with others, practicing vegan consumption habits becomes but one action taken in accordance with a larger political orientation. Emphasizing vegan eating as one of many means rather than the end can help to cultivate an understanding of veganism as much more than just one’s eating habits, which can in turn promote a de-linking of veganism and eating disorders.

Additionally, vegan health arguments work to uphold capitalist, statist ideologies that delineate what count as “normal” (and thus acceptable) bodies–exactly the ideologies that help to foster a proliferation of eating disorders in the first place. I think that our conceptions of what counts as a “healthy body” are largely constructed by the capitalist economic system in which we live, which seeks to constantly accumulate more and more wealth. In order to achieve that constant accumulation, capitalism needs to employ as many people as possible in the service of profit-making. Since profit-making depends upon maximized productivity, the capitalist state can only thrive if it creates maximally productive (i.e., “healthy”) bodies — i.e., “healthy” bodies. Virtually all of us internalized a capitalist ideology that conditions us to see productive/”healthy” bodies as normal and superior to all others, so I understand what we tend to perceive as self-betterment as actually in service of the capitalist state. 

This construction of “healthy” bodies is also profoundly ableist — if we understand ableism as a set of practices and beliefs that assign inferior value to people who live with developmental, emotional, physical or psychiatric disabilities — since they imply that thin, fully mobile, muscular bodies are the “best bodies.” 

I’m not saying here that we shouldn’t strive to feel good in our bodies, but I am saying that we should strive to dissociate what feeling good means to ourselves from what constructions of a capitalist, statist society tell us our body should look and feel like. For example, currently and for a long time now, I’ve only been able to “feel good” in my body if I can perceive it as thin, thanks to Western societal ideals of body size. So, for me, dissociating feeling good from societal constructions would mean assessing my body on how well it can support me in everything I need and love to do, rather than on its size.

So yes, it’s very disappointing to see veganism employed as a front for eating disorders. But I think that instead of getting angry with individual former vegans for having internalized Western societal conceptions of “the ideal body” and grasping onto what is presented as a food-centric, “health”-related philosophy, we as proponents of veganism should work to challenge these capitalist/statist conceptions of “healthy” bodies by emphasizing eating as but one of many political actions in the service of anti-speciesism.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {5-22-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hello, all, and welcome to another edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)! First, let me apologize for not publishing a post this past Monday–I was finishing up the last of my college finals and couldn’t find the mental energy to devote to crafting a post. Rest assured, though, C&C will be up and publishing once again next Monday. But for now, enjoy the best of the week’s recipes and stories (well, at least IMHO).

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Crisp Chickpea & Kale Salad with Apricots, Fried Fennel, & Tahini-Avocado Goddess Dressing
Via Will Frolic for Food

Photo via Renee Byrd.

Photo via Renee Byrd.

Wow, hi, thank you for combining a great many fabulous ingredients into a hearty, complexly layered salad. And for introducing me to the flavor combination of caramelized fennel and apricots! I bet it’s winning…

Sweet

Apple Crumble Breakfast Parfait
Via To Her Core

Photo via Dearna of To Her Core.

Photo via Dearna of To Her Core.

I’m not usually one for hot, porridge-y breakfasts, but this one — layered between tender apples, tangy yogurt (vegan, please), spiced nuts and seeds — may just change my mind.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Chickpea Salad Sandwich
Via Olives for Dinner

Photo via Jeff Wysocarski.

Photo via Jeff Wysocarski.

In case you’re new to C&C, let me reveal to you my undying affection for (vegan) mayonnaise-based salads, especially those that involve smashed chickpeas. This one from Erin over at Olives for Dinner serves as a pretty standard chickpea salad template, a huge batch of which my housemates (understandably) scarfed down over the course of two days.

Must-Read Article(s)

I want to highlight two articles today, in order to emphasize a pair of this week’s biggest news stories (at least in the media that I consume on a daily basis…which is more than The New Republic, I promise).

Could the Boston Marathon Bomber Receive a Fair Trial in Boston?
By Karen Pita Loor at The New Republic

From The Guardian:: "Demonstrators against the death penalty stand outside federal court in Boston during first day of the penalty phase for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev." Photograph: John Tlumacki/AP.

From The Guardian: “Demonstrators against the death penalty stand outside federal court in Boston during first day of the penalty phase for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.” Photograph: John Tlumacki/AP.

After a federal court sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev — the Boston Marathon bomber — to death (despite the fact that Massachusetts has long outlawed the death penalty) this past week, discussions of capital punishment and the implications of a death-qualified jury have come to the fore. This article from Karen Pita Loor distills some of those discussions.

Data-Driven Policing
By Jamil Smith at The New Republic

From NJ.com: "Camden County Officer Virginia Matias (second from right) sits with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, as they meet with rank-and-file law enforcement officials from across the country in the Oval Office, Feb. 24, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)."

From NJ.com: “Camden County Officer Virginia Matias (second from right) sits with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, as they meet with rank-and-file law enforcement officials from across the country in the Oval Office, Feb. 24, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza).”

Whenever Obama announces something seemingly progressive, it’s prudent to take a critical look at that something. Most recently, Obama revealed that he would “prohibit some equipment made for the battlefield that is not appropriate for local police departments.” De-militarizing police? Sure! But wait…this article by Jamil Smith discusses some of the not-so-great implications of this new policy.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Unconventional Wisdom
Via Disorderly Conduct

Photo via Tarbell Industries.

Photo via Tarbell Industries.

If you’ve never listened to Alexis and Jesse’s progressive labor-and-economics-focused podcast, I would highly recommend that you add it to your regular listening repertoire. This particular episode features an interview with Maya Schenwar, one of my favorite journalists, editor-in-chief at Truthout, and author of the new book against mass incarceration, entitled Locked Down, Locked Out.

Book Recommendation

Poetics of Relation
By Edouard Glissant

Photo via TheFunambulist.net.

Photo via TheFunambulist.net.

For me the overarching theme of this spring semester has involved investigating the question of how to coexist in the world with others. Glissant’s poetic work does a marvelously artistic job of pointing out where typically unquestioned ideologies prevent us from building community, and of suggesting where we might look in developing new strategies for how to challenge individualism in the name of Relation.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {5-15-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hi, friends! Happy Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews) Day, amirite? Enjoy some spicy, messy tacos before cooling off and cleansing your palate with an intriguingly flavored, dairy-free ice cream that you could totally scoop onto the final recipe featured today (yummm…). In not so yummy news, I’m sharing with ya’ll a phenomenal piece of investigative journalism on the 34 students disappeared in Mexico lat year, the latest in treating police officers as exceptional in the face of murdered Black people, and a must-read scholarly article for any and all white people concerned with racial justice.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Jackfruit Asada Street Tacos
Via Fettle Vegan

Photo via Amber St. Peter.

Photo via Amber St. Peter.

When I can get my hands on it, jackfruit provides me with an ideal ingredient platform for creamy “chicken”-style salads to spread on sandwiches, and for spicy BBQ “pulled pork” to slather on a bun. In these taacos, jackfruit sports a brightly flavored marinade that I can easily envision myself enjoying on my backyard patio in the summertime.

Sweet

French Tarragon & Olive Oil Ice Cream
Via The Circus Gardener’s Kitchen

Photo via Steve Dent.

Photo via Steve Dent.

Put herbs in a dessert and I’ll be all over it, especially when that dessert has some creamy-coconutty yumminess goin’ on.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Bread Pudding
Inspired by Fat-Free Vegan Kitchen

Photo via Susan Voisin.

Photo via Susan Voisin.

What do you do when you and your housemate discover over 30 loaves of totally edible bread sitting outside of the dumpster behind a health food store? You take them back to your co-op and stick ’em all in the freezer. And then you start worrying that all this bread is never going to get eaten before we all have to leave campus for the summer in three weeks so you make bread pudding.

Must-Read Article

Ghosts of Iguala–Mexico: Case Unravels in Disappearance of 43 Students
By Ryan Devereaux at The Intercept

461470968-1024x682

Protestors confront police in front of the 27th Infantry Battalion base in Iguala on January 12, 2015. (Eric Chavelas Hernandez/Anadolu/Getty)

I first heard about Ryan’s coverage of this intricate and ongoing story on the Radio Dispatch podcast, and immediately ran over to The Intercept to read his two-part investigation. If you’ve been at all following the case of the 43 disappeared students in Mexico and the larger political context of such an event, this phenomenal instance of journalism is a must-read.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Wisconsin Activists to Continue Protests After Cop Avoids Charges in Killing of Tony Robinson
Via Democracy Now!

Protestors marched for justice for Tony Robinson, and for all black people. Photograph: Michael P. King/AP

Protestors marched for justice for Tony Robinson, and for all black people. Photograph: Michael P. King/AP

Remember back to March when a police officer in my hometown of Madison, WI forced his way into the home of Tony Robinson and fatally shot the Black teenager? Well, big surprise, no charges have been brought against that police officer. I think I’m starting to see a pattern here…

Book Recommendation

White Fragility
By Robin DiAngelo

Photo via The Pundit Press.

Photo via The Pundit Press.

Okay, so it’s not a book, but it’s a really great scholarly article! We read this piece by Robin DiAngelo in a workshop hosted on my college campus on white identity formation and anti-racist work, and it really resonated with my journey as a white person coming to racial consciousness. I’d highly recommend this article to all white people concerned with racial justice (which should be all white people…).

In solidarity, Ali.

Summer Plans

Hi, folks! Just a short post today, as I have to prepare loads and loads of animal-free bacon-y goodies for today’s (well, last Friday’s by the time you read this) Vegan Bacon Tasting, hosted by the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC). As such, I thought I’d let ya’ll know about my summer plans, since they involve lots of cool (well, I think, at least) animal justice-related endeavors, including a sanctuary internship and a field work project for my Geography major.

First, I’ll be spending five days a week working full-time at Heartland Farm Sanctuary, a five-year-old sanctuary just outside of my hometown’s city limits. In addition to feeding the residents, cleaning out their barns, accompanying them on medical visits (including to a licensed Reiki practitioner!), and giving them lots of love, I’ll also be helping out the leaders of Heartland’s summer camp for schoolchildren and assisting in some event-planning.

download

As I’ve mentioned on the blog before, I’ve become increasingly committed to learning how to more adequately communicate with other animals, to really listen to the folks with whom I seek to work in solidarity. I’m eager to further pursue this practice at Heartland this summer, both by working there and through my aforementioned Geography field work project. Through this project, I intend to highlight the marginalized voices within animal justice work, including women of color, slaughterhouse workers, and the animals themselves. In doing so, I hope to challenge the animal justice movement’s privileging and exclusionary visibilizing of white, wealthy men in order to advance a more radical agenda of animal justice, as laid out by the movement’s oft silenced voices. I would greatly appreciate any reading/resource suggestions from ya’ll, as I’ve only just begun constructing the syllabus for this project.

Anywho, I’ve got to go get up to my elbows in vegan bacon grease, so I wish you a lovely week and look forward to hearing any resource recommendations you might have.

In solidarity, Ali.