Vegan Chews & Progressive News {2-20-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the 37th installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews), everyone! Today’s recipes feature some winning flavor combinations, while the stories highlight some truly astounding activists working at the marginalized intersections. Enjooooy.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Easy Sesame Cauliflower
Via My Whole Food Life

Photo via Melissa King.

Photo via Melissa King.

I’m a sucker for basically everything going on in this recipe: that genius combination of tangy, salty, and sweet flavors; starch-thickened sauces; tender cauliflower; a brightening addition of scallions to finish off a dish. Yes, this is one side dish I would happily turn into a whole meal.

Sweet

Matcha Pear White Chocolate Layer Cake
Via Fragrant Vanilla Cake

Photo via Amy Lyons

Photo via Amy Lyons

Show-stopper, amirite? Though I’ve never considered it before, the combination of sweet, champagne-flavored pears with matcha’s mysterious astringence strikes me as rather incredible. When that combo is implemented in the form of cocoa butter-spiked, velvety frosting, I can’t help my jaw from dropping. The recipe calls for a hefty amount of (usually expensive) coconut butter, but I’d wager a guess that the cake would taste just as decadent and fancy-schmancy with the much cheaper Earth Balance vegan butter.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Za’atar Roasted Chickpeas
Via Sunday Morning Banana Pancakes

Photo via Heather Poire.

Photo via Heather Poire.

I’ve spoken of my enthusiasm for the Middle Eastern seasoning known as za’atar, but here I am again, highlighting another za’atar-centric recipe (let me know if I start to sound like a broken record). I whipped up a big ol’ batch of these crunchy, brightly seasoned morsels for my cooperative house, and they disappeared within moments.

Must-Read News Story

Black, Queer, Feminist, Erased from history: Meet the Most Important Legal Scholar You’ve Likely Never Heard Of
By Brittney Cooper at Salon

Photo via Associated Press.

Photo via Associated Press.

The deeply embedded structures of white supremacy and heteropatriarchy have a habit of erasing non-white, gender nonconforming groups and individuals from the collective memory—even (or especially?) those groups and individuals who contributed truly groundbreaking work to their fields of work. One such individual, as professor Brittney Cooper points out, is Pauli Murray—the queer Black lawyer who helped to pioneer the legal strategy for fighting gender-based descrimination. Though trans terminology was not available to Murray in the 1930s and 40s (it wasn’t invented until the 1950s), Cooper notes that it is likely that this groundbreaking activist probably would have embraced a transgender identity.

Cooper offers the following regarding the historical erasure of Murray’s work:

“The civil rights struggle demanded respectable performances of black manhood and womanhood, particularly from its heroes and heroines, and respectability meant being educated, heterosexual, married and Christian. Murray’s open lesbian relationships and her gender nonconforming identity disrupted the dictates of respectability, making it easier to erase her five decades of important intellectual and political contributions from our broader narrative of civil rights.”

A good reminder to always center those working at society’s margins in our historical and contemporary memories.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

The Kitty Bella Show
By Katrina Goodlett

Photo via Katrina Goodlett.

Photo via Katrina Goodlett.

I’m not highlighting a specific episode today, but rather an entire podcast. Katrina Goodlett hosts a fabulous radio show that focuses on the activist work of trans people of color, including performance duo DarkMatter, spiritual psychic empath Noah Alvarez, singer/writer Lady Dane, Janet Mock, Monica Roberts, Angelica Ross and many more. I would highly recommend tuning in each Monday.

Book Recommendation Awesome Projects That you should totally Check out

Call for Submissions: “On Violence” Issue of Project Intersect
Via Ashley Jo Maier

Photo via Project Intersect.

Photo via Project Intersect.

I’ve featured Project Intersect before on the blog, and am thrilled to let ya’ll know that the radical feminist, anti-speciesist crit-zine is currently seeking submissions for their second issue. This issue will focus on understandings of violence in the context of approaches to radical earth, animal, and feminist liberation. Submissions are due on May 31st, so there’s plenty of time for ya’ll to brainstorm and write!

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {1-23-15}

Hey, ya’ll! Quick note before launching into #NewsandChews: if you haven’t yet had the chance to enter my latest giveaway to win a copy of food blogger extraordinaire Kristy Turner’s new cookbook But I Could Never Go Vegan!, then be sure to head on over to the post! Also read my review of the book and get a recipe for Kristy’s Caramel Apple-Stuffed French Toast.

Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy late MLK Day, everyone! This edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews) pays homage to the radical legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., so often sanitized by the white supremacist powers that dictate which aspects of history to erase. But first, check out three recipes that have nothing to do with MLK (except that they’re vegan and Coretta Scott King also held vegan principles, so there’s that). Then, as if MLK and the incredible #BlackLivesMatter organizers didn’t provide enough inspiring activism for you, meet the powerhouse queer, anti-speciesist activist Hana Low. Onward!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Maple-Cinnamon Delicata Squash Salad with Jackfruit Bacon
Via Sweet Simple Vegan

Photo via Jasmine Briones.

Photo via Jasmine Briones.

This colorful, nutrient-rich salad bowl screams of textural interest and flavorful simplicity, especially with the delicata squash’s mild succulence and the jackfruit’s smoky toothsome-ness. But really, when avocado and brussels sprouts are involved, I’m hooked immediately, no questions asked.

Sweet

Sweet Dukkah Cigars
Via Golubka

Photo via Anya Kassoff.

Photo via Anya Kassoff.

Dukkah — an Egyptian spice blend of toasted nuts and seeds — takes center stage in these decadent yet sophisticated crepe-like pastries. Anya’s particular dukkah features pistachios and hazelnuts (two of my favorite nuts), as well as coriander and cardamom (two of my favorite spices). Interestingly, her dough incorporates a bit of miso paste, which I’m intrigued to try out. Make sure to use agave or maple syrup in place of the honey when called for, because bees make honey for themselves to eat, not for us!

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Crispy Orange Cauliflower
Via Cara Reed at Vegan Richa

Photo via Cara Reed.

Photo via Cara Reed.

I’m a sucker for Asian-inspired sauces thickened with cornstarch; I just can’t get enough of that viscous texture and salty-sweet flavor. This orange-centric one from Cara Reed of the Fork and Beans blog seems like just the sauce to please my palate, especially when it coats the Mighty Cauliflower — master and most versatile of the vegetable fiefdom (because plants still operate in feudal times, right?).

Must-Read News Story

#ReclaimMLK
Via Ferguson Action

Photo via Deray McKesson (@deray).

Photo via Deray McKesson (@deray).

On this past MLK Day, thousands of #BlackLivesMatter activists did some hugely important organizing, uniting to #ReclaimMLK from the sanitized versions of his legacy that we learn in the white supremacist history books. While we often only hear about Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech — so easily co-opted by white people who employ the rhetoric of reverse racism — we seldom learn that he linked capitalism’s injustice with racism and militarization, and whose assassination was planned by the U.S. government in an attempt to stop him from shifting the status quo.

I’d like to share the words of Ferguson Action to further expand upon the importance of this organizing:

“The present day Movement for Black Lives draws a direct line from the legacy of Dr. King and the current struggle we face today. Unfortunately, Dr. King’s legacy has been clouded by efforts to soften, sanitize, and commercialize it. Impulses to remove Dr. King from the movement that elevated him must end. We resist efforts to reduce a long history marred with the blood of countless members of our community into iconic images of men in suits behind pulpits. From here on, MLK weekend will be known as a time of national resistance to injustice. This MLK weekend we will walk in the legacy of Dr. King and the movement that raised him.”

Check out the following four news stories for more details on this year’s #ReclaimMLK demonstrations and demands:

Taking Back the Streets and Their Stories, Thousands Reclaim MLK Day
By Lauren McCauley at Common Dreams

What You Can Do to Highlight MLK’s Radical Legacy
By Alyssa Figueroa at AlterNet

Black Lives Matter Aspires to Reclaim the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.
Via Gabrielle Canon and Bryan Schatz at Mother Jones

Martin Luther King and the Black Revolutionary Tradition
By Eric Mann at Counterpunch

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

DN! In Depth: Martin Luther King Jr. & the Civil Rights Movement
Via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

For more on MLK’s radical legacy, check out the collection of interviews, speeches, and other videos that Democracy Nowhas compiled to de-sanitize Dr. King’s work.

Book Recommendation Awesome Projects That You Should Totally Check Out

Hana Low’s Opening Cages for Collective Liberation

Photo via Hana Low.

Photo via Hana Low.

I recently became familiar with the work of Hana Low, a queer and genderqueer anti-speciesist vegan based in Denver, CO whose feminist principles pervades their writing and activism. With essays on why pro-choice does not mean anti-vegan, participating in Vegan MoFo on a SNAP budget, and confronting colonialism and whiteness in vegan communities, Hana’s blog is one that I want to help spread far and wide. It’s voices like Hana’s that need to be at the forefront of activism for other animals — voices that advocate collective liberation for all.

In solidarity, Ali.

“But I Could Never Go Vegan!” Cookbook Review & Giveaway

Sorry, this giveaway has closed.

Can you feel it? The twinge in the air? The rumbling in the distance? It’s coming…it’s…another cookbook giveaway!!!

If ya’ll caught my late-December post about some changes I intend to make very soon on the blog, then you’ll remember the dilemma I’ve been grappling with concerning product reviews and giveaways. To sum up, I’m trying to navigate challenging the consumerism that has overshadowed the anti-speciesism at the heart of veganism, and worry that product reviews and giveaways re-center the materialistic focus of the capitalist system in which we as Westerners are so indoctrinated.

Two fabulous readers, however, offered up some super helpful advice in response to my concerns. Here’s what Elizabeth and Raechel have to say:

“I appreciate your dilemma – as Zizek is fond of saying, it’s easier for most people to imagine the end of the world than to imagine the end of capitalism, that’s the extent to which neoliberalism has captured our very capacity to think. So those of us engaged in imagining alternatives have our work cut out for us. The problem is, we anti-capitalists (or vegans, or Christians, or whatever epistemological designation we prefer) inhabit a capitalist world, in which we have to survive somehow. Etienne Balibar distinguishes between “communism” (which doesn’t exist, and has never existed) and “communists” (of which there are many) and the impossibility of extrapolating between the two, because every communist will make different compromises with capitalism. We can extricate ourselves only so much – the more conscious we are, the more we succeed, in avoiding the language of the marketplace in describing social relations, for example – but we won’t succeed completely, so it doesn’t diminish your message if you support your local farmers’ market or a [vegan] company.” ~ Elizabeth A.

“Although it is admirable to not participate in gross consumer habits and although it is super important to make clear that real ethical consumption doesn’t exist in global capitalism, the real struggle rests in the labor and production, not the consumption. Even outside of my politics, by both choice and necessity, I am not a very material person […] but I have come to realize that it doesn’t actually matter that much. […] [A]ssuming our individual consumption habits can do anything to challenge capitalism is a neoliberal idea. I don’t think it’s useless to buy fair trade products, nor do I think it’s meaningless that I don’t buy animal products, but as you know, what those buying habits do is invite more products, not less. What I’ve come to realize now, as a Marxist, [is that] it only really matters to not buy things if there is a call to not buy it/support it/shop at it/etc. *from the workers.* I support worker-led boycotts, and other than that, I buy things that are good on my conscience, while fully knowing it doesn’t make much difference outside of me feeling good. So […]*not* doing product reviews won’t challenge capitalism. And doing product reviews doesn’t make you a bad activist, at least not from a Marxist perspective.” ~ Raechel.

So there we are. We all get some fantastic food for thought, and ya’ll get your chance to win a cookbook. Win-win. Just don’t let it threaten your commitment to anti-capitalism, ya hear? ;)

Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

I do also have an inkling that highlighting the work of those who envision a more just world for all beings has the potential to contribute to fostering the very community that capitalism’s individualistic rhetoric stifles. For example, I’m overjoyed to share with ya’ll the latest project of Kristy Turner, a committed animal activist and talented vegan blogger with whom I’ve had the privilege to connect during my time in the blogosphere. Her just-released book, But I Could Never Go Vegan!: 125 Recipes that Prove You Can Live Without Cheese, It’s Not All Rabbit Food, and Your Friends Will Still Come Over For Dinner, is an absolute masterpiece, and I’m thrilled that one of ya’ll will win a copy!

Author Kristy Turner / Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

Author Kristy Turner / Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

With a bright and inviting layout, mouthwatering photographs by Kristy’s husband Chris Miller, and charming text from Kristy herself, But I Could Never Go Vegan! serves as one of the most innovative cookbooks I’ve come across in a long while. Organized into sections by the excuses one often hears for not adopting a vegan diet, But I Could Never Go Vegan! playfully and deliciously refutes such justifications as “I could never give up cheese!” (how about after a bite of Tempeh Bacon Mac ‘n’ Cheese with Pecan Parmesan?), “It’s all rabbit food” (I’m sorry, I couldn’t hear you over my enormous pile of Jackfruit Nachos Supreme), “Just thinking about salad makes me yawn” (even this BBQ Cauliflower Salad with Zesty Ranch Dressing?), “You can’t bake without butter or eggs!” (then what on earth is this Rosemary-Lemon Pound Cake with Lemon Glaze doing here?), and beyond.

Of course, I would like to note that there are many legitimate reasons for not being able to adopt a vegan lifestyle that are not listed in this book, such as lack of access to plant foods because of geographic location (think “food deserts”) and/or socioeconomic status, desire to distance oneself from a movement made up primarily of people with whom you don’t identify (i.e., people of color looking at a movement where upper-middle-class white people dominate), and desire to preserve one’s heritage — threatened by Western forces of assimilation — through one’s diet. But that’s another post.

I had the pleasure of preparing four recipes from Kristy’s new book, but choosing among them proved a phenomenally difficult task – I don’t encounter recipes this well thought-out, creative, or clearly written very often (and I must have email subscriptions to over 30 different food blogs at this point…). Rest assured, I labored through this heroic effort to bring you a glimpse into But I Could Never Go Vegan! with the following four recipes.

My first foray into Kristy’s realm of culinary genius involved her Thai Seitan Satay with Spicy Peanut Dipping Sauce, housed in the book’s “Where’s the Beef?: ‘Meaty’ Food, Minus the Meat” section. Subbing tempeh for the seitan to test if the recipe would hold up to experimentation, I was verily impressed by the intense flavor lent to the tempeh by a bright marinade of lemongrass and curry powder. And who can argue with a creamy, spicy-sweet sauce chock full of the master of all nut butters?

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Next up on my recipe testing list: the Chickpea Scramble Breakfast Tacos, which emphatically answer the skeptical question, “What about brunch?” Showcasing a method for plant-based breakfast scrambling that fascinated me upon first read, Kristy first stirs up a polenta-like batter of chickpea flour and savory spices (including the infamous black salt that imparts a sulfurous, “eggy” flavor to foods) that she then chills until firm, cuts into cubes, and browns in a skillet to create a creamy-chewy-umami-super flavorful scramble. Honestly, what could you do with it except stuff it into crispy corn tortillas along with roasted sweet potatoes, bell peppers, and avocado? And then finish it off with cilantro and hot sauce, of course.

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From the “Fake ‘Foods’ Freak Me Out: Solid Vegan Recipes That Aren’t Imitating Meat, Dairy, or Anything Else” section, the Potato & Pea Samosa Cakes with Tamarind Sauce immediately caught my eye. My unquenchable enthusiasm for potatoes and green peas made it very difficult not to rave about these tenderly textured and generously spiced patties, and my tamarind fangirl-ing drew me even closer to the recipe. While I do wish that the colorful cakes cooked up a bit crispier and were perhaps a bit more delicately spiced, dipping them into that sweet-and-sour sauce made it difficult to focus on the ever-so-slightly negative.

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Finally, I tackled the “I’d Miss Pizza” excuse section with Kristy’s Seitan Reuben Pizza with Caraway Seed Crust. I’m sorry, allow me to repeat: SEITAN REUBEN PIZZA WITH CARAWAY SEED CRUST. A winning sandwich transformed into a defining food of my Italian heritage? Be still my beating heart. First, whip up a batch of Kristy’s simple yet juicy and oh-so flavorful homemade seitan, then “corn” it in a bright marinade of beet juice and characteristic spices. Next, get a ball of super easy pizza dough rising, rife with the fragrant savoriness of caraway seeds. An almond-based swiss cheese sauce and mayo-ketchup Russian dressing later, and you’ve got a flavor-drenched pie packed with that classic Reuben sandwich charm, ready for a generous forkful of sauerkraut. Yes.

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I’d feel cruel for tantalizing you with all this deliciousness without offering you the chance to taste it for yourself, so I’m excited that the folks over at The Experiment Publishing have graciously offered to let me share with you the full recipe for Kristy’s Caramel Apple-Stuffed French Toast! Enjoy, and be sure to enter the giveaway to win a copy of But I Could Never Go Vegan! by following the links at the top and bottom of this post.

Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

Photo via The Experiment Publishing.

Caramel Apple-Stuffed French Toast

Serves 4 t0 6.

Nut-Free.

From Kristy:
French toast on its own is a normal weekend breakfast, and chickpea flour and non-dairy milk make for a simple vegan version. When you stuff a delicious filling inside, you’ve got more of a special-occasion meal on your hands (or plate)—especially when that filling is warm, caramelized apples tossed in a rich, date-based caramel sauce, and even more especially when the French toast is dusted with powdered sugar and drizzled with extra sauce. One of my recipe testers made it for her husband on Valentine’s Day, and they thought it was the perfect celebration meal. Breakfast in bed, anyone?

Prep time: 30 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Caramel Sauce Ingredients:

10 Medjool dates, pitted
2⁄3 cup (160 ml) non-dairy milk
1⁄4 cup (60 ml) water
1⁄2 teaspoon vanilla extract
Salt to taste

Apple Ingredients:

1 tablespoon vegan butter
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons coconut sugar or vegan brown sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice

French Toast Ingredients:

1 cup (250 ml) non-dairy milk
1⁄2 cup (125 ml) canned coconut milk or vegan creamer
1⁄2 cup (55 g) chickpea flour
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 1⁄2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1⁄2 teaspoon cinnamon
Dash of nutmeg
Dash of salt
1 large loaf of French bread, about 4 to 5 inches wide (not a baguette)
Vegan cream cheese
Cooking spray
Maple syrup, for drizzling
Vegan powdered sugar or powdered xylitol, for dusting, optional

In a food processor, combine the caramel sauce ingredients. Process until completely smooth, scraping the sides as necessary.

Melt the vegan butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the apple slices and coconut sugar; stir to combine. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is gone and the apples are softened and golden. Stir in the lemon juice and remove from the heat. Stir in 2 tablespoons of the caramel sauce.

In a large shallow bowl or baking dish, mix the non-dairy milk, coconut milk, chickpea flour, maple syrup, cornstarch, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Slice the bread into four to six 2-inch (5 cm) slices. Use a bread knife to make a slit in the top of each slice, keeping the sides and bottom intact, creating a pocket.

Carefully spread the cream cheese inside one side of each pocket, then stuff it with about 1⁄3 cup (80 ml) of apples.

Preheat the oven to its lowest setting. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. Set aside.

Heat a large frying pan or griddle over medium heat. Spray generously with cooking spray. Take one “sandwich” and soak in the milk mixture, 15 to 20 seconds on each side. Place the soaked sandwich on the heated pan and cook until golden and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes on each side. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet and place in the oven. Repeat with the remaining sandwiches, spraying the pan again before each. Serve warm, topped with maple syrup, the remaining caramel sauce, or both. Dust with powdered sugar if desired.

Variations

Simplify the recipe by leaving out the caramel sauce and replacing the apples with uncooked strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, or even mango!

Make plain French toast by slicing regular-size slices of bread and leaving out the fruit and caramel altogether.

Recipe from But I Could Never Go Vegan!: 125 Recipes That Prove You Can Live Without Cheese, It’s Not All Rabbit Food, and Your Friends Will Still Come Over Dinner, copyright © Kristy Turner, 2014. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. www.theexperimentpublishing.com

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Thursday, January 29, and I will announce the winner on the following day on #NewsandChews.

Sorry, this giveaway has closed.

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with a free copy of the cookbook. All opinions are completely my own.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {1-16-15}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to your third Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews) of the year! This one’s got some mouthwatering grub featuring the almighty Crispy Potato and a ridiculously fast, simple, and flavor-packed side dish. For stories, I’m focusing on the hypocrisy and anti-Muslim racism rapidly circulating in the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo massacre (which was obviously an awful, awful attack, but that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t critically question how we respond to it). Then! An ahhh-maaa-ziiing project that highlights the voices of those with marginalized identities who also have histories of disordered eating. Today’s a good one, folks!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Country Hash
Via Everyday Vegan Eats by Zsu Dever, republished at Vegan Heritage Press

Photo via Vegan Heritage Press.

Photo via Vegan Heritage Press.

Crispy potatoes. Chewy tofu. Savory herbs. All cooked up in one cast iron skillet for a seriously satisfying brinner (breakfast for dinner, if ya’ll don’t know). Plus! This recipe provides an optimal venue to experiment with my newly acquired black salt (an Indian salt, actually tinted pink, that lends a sulfurous flavor to foods and thus makes them taste “eggy”…without all of the reproductive exploitation).

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Brussels Sprouts with Onions and Pecans
Via In Sonnet’s Kitchen

Photo via Sonnet Lauberth.

Photo via Sonnet Lauberth.

A phenomenally simple, 5-ingredient dish bursting with succulent flavor from caramelized onions, tender brussels sprouts, and buttery pecans. Try this one on for size on those nights when you can’t bear to think about spending more than 15 minutes in the kitchen.

Must-Read News Story

Unmournable Bodies
Via Teju Cole at The New Yorker

Photo via Dursin Aydemir / Anadolu / Getty

Photo via Dursin Aydemir / Anadolu / Getty

In the wake of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, a ton of hypocrisy and anti-Muslim sentiments have been circulating among various punditry venues. This brilliant article by Teju Cole unpacks the event’s fallout, and reminds us that we must “defend the right to obscene and racist speech without promoting or sponsoring the content of that speech.” Additionally, Cole points to the longstanding attack on journalists by such Western countries as the United States as indicative of our propensity to blame the Other (in this case, followers of Islam whom we’ve long targeted) before taking a good hard look at ourselves.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

“‘Circus of Hypocrisy’: Jeremy Scahill on How World Leaders at Paris March Oppose Press Freedom
Via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

More on the hypocrisy rampant in the aftermath of Charlie Hebdo, this time from The Intercept co-founder Jeremy Scahill.

Book Recommendation Awesome Projects That You Should Totally Check Out

#marginalizED
Via Melissa A. Fabello & NEDA

Photo via Melissa A. Fabello.

Photo via Melissa A. Fabello.

I’m in love. I love this project. Please spread this project far and wide.

“When you think of eating disorder stories, most of them are told from the same perspective: young, white, able-bodided, middle-class women living in a Western, English-speaking country who suffer a restrictive eating disorder, eventually seek in-patient treatment, and find the road to recovery.

“And while these stories are important and absolutely need to be told, they simply aren’t giving the public (including the professional eating disorder world) an honest account of how eating disorders are experienced by a wide range of people. …

The #marginalizED project is a joint effort between the National Eating Disorders Association and writer, activist, and Managing Editor of Everyday Feminism, Melissa A. Fabello. Disparaged by the lack of diverse voices in eating disorder memoirs, they decided to join forces to curate an anthology of narratives speaking to marginalized experiences in eating disorder suffering and recovery.”

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {11-28-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Howdy, folks! Hope you’re enjoying the first round of holidays in the winter season. I do urge you, though, to recognize the genocidal origins of Thanksgiving, which I expound upon in a recent post entitled “A Vegan Thanksgiving is Still Violent.”

In terms of today’s Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews), we’ve got two vibrant and creative interpretations of familiar autumnal ingredients, a round-up of stories and a podcast that highlight the systematized white supremacy behind Ferguson, and a book that will call into question everything you thought you knew about Gandhi.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries, & Grapes
via Golubka Kitchen

Photo via Anya Kassoff.

Photo via Anya Kassoff.

The combination of chewy whole grains, candy-sweet dried fruit, and crunchy, earthy nuts will never fail to astound me. The equally phenomenal smoky flavor of roasted brussels sprouts takes that no-fail grain-fruit-nut combo to the next level.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Squash with Cardamom & Nigella Seeds
via Yotam Ottolenghi in “Plenty More

Photo within photo via Plenty More.

Photo within photo via Plenty More.

A succulent dish of slow-roasted squash with warming, sweet spices studded with crunchy pumpkin seeds, this recipes comes from my latest cookbook obsessionPlenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi. Though not a vegan cookbook by any means, Plenty More serves as a continuation of Ottolenghi’s celebration of the world of plant-food first documented in his book Plenty. With a little veganizing know-how and creativity, figuring out how to create animal-free versions of Ottolenghi’s masterfully crafted dishes serves as an entertaining (and scrumptious) endeavor.

Must-Read News Story

Photo via the LA Times.

Photo via the LA Times.

It feels wrong to me to highlight any stories this week unrelated to the systemic violence (psychological and physical) committed in the United States against Black bodies on a daily basis. The murder of Mike Brown serves as perhaps the most visible instances of this violence in the current moment. As such, today I want to spread around a number of articles that emphasize the structural failures integral to Ferguson, rather than miss the point by focusing on police brutality. I turn to a quote from Catalyst Project to highlight this distinction:

“What’s happening in Ferguson is not just about police brutality or the increased militarization of police departments. It is about a system of policing that uses daily violence on Black, Brown, and poor communities in order to protect the property, politics and profits of the rich. It is about a system of control and terror that teaches white people we should be afraid of Black people, then uses that fear to justify state violence.”

Here are the stories:

Being Black: The Real Indictment in Ferguson and the USA
by William C. Anderson at Truthout

A Response to Ferguson: Systemic Problems Require Systemic Solutions
by john a. powell at CommonDreams

Ferguson Isn’t About Black Rage Against Cops. It’s White Rage Against Progress.
by Carol Anderson at CommonDreams

Free Marissa and All Black People
by Mariame Kaba at Prison Culture

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Mychal Denzel Smith on Lack of Indictment in Ferguson
via Radio Dispatch

Photo via Popular Resistance.

Photo via Popular Resistance.

…continuing the Ferguson (and beyond) discussion. Features a detailed look into the problems behind the grand jury decision deliberations (and behind the criminal legal system, in general).

Book Recommendation

The Impossible Indian: Gandhi and the Temptation of Violence
by Faisal Devji

Photo via Harvard University Press.

Photo via Harvard University Press.

A fascinating look into the aspects of Gandhi’s politics that mainstream rhetoric surrounding him as a figure tend to obscure (did Gandhi really advocate unconditional nonviolence? What were his views on the caste system?). Also a formative resource for thinking about the potential for social change beyond the framework of the neoliberal state.

In solidarity, Ali.

Pickle-Braised Greens & Beans

pickle-braised greens (1)

Well folks, last week I provided you with a critical thought piece on Thanksgiving, but no recipe, since I had devoted all of my recipe energies to creating tempeh chili, cornbread, pumpkin pancakes, coconut whipped cream, cookies, and spicy mac & cheese for the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC)‘s week-long event series on government repression of animal activism. This week, I’m leveling out the blogging playing field by offering up a recipe…but no thoughts, since I’m currently channeling all of my intellectual energies into a 20-page paper on white anti-racist activism due in the next couple of days.

pickle-braised greens (4)

If any of you find yourselves in similar time crunches, I’d highly recommend incorporating this no-fuss, 10-minute, 4-ingredient side dish that boasts a ton of tangy flavor and nutrient density to provide the energy you need to accomplish all those tasks ahead. Not only does this recipe provide a spectacularly fast, simple meal when paired with a whole grain or piece of toast, it also makes phenomenal use of the flavor-packed brine left over after you take that last, sweet bite of pickle.

pickle-braised greens (3)

I’ve recreated this recipe with a wide variety of leftover pickle brines, from a smoky, paprika-laden okra pickling liquid to the maple-and-bourbon laced brine of bread-and-butter cukes. Each unique pickling liquid produced essentially an entirely new dish, so this base recipe truly never tires. Now go on and get down with your pickle-loving self (while I finish writing that paper…).

pickle-braised greens (2)

Pickle-Braised Greens & Beans

Serves 1-2.

Ingredients:

1 jar’s worth pickle juice left over after pickles have been eaten
5-ish cups (about half a bunch) kale or collard greens, chopped
1/2 cup chickpeas
1 tsp coconut or flaxseed oil (optional)

Pour the pickle juice into a medium-sized saute pan. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat.

Add the chopped greens to the pan, cover, reduce the heat slightly to medium-high, and cook for about 5 minutes, or until the greens are starting to wilt and turn tender; their color will also start to darken.

Uncover the greens, stir in the beans, and continue to cook over medium-high heat for another 3-5 minutes, or until most of the liquid has boiled off. Remove from the heat.

If desired, for a more full-bodied mouthfeel and richer taste, stir in the optional coconut or flaxseed oil.

Serve immediately.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {11-21-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Hello, all, and welcome to the 25th anniversary of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)On this chilly Friday, I’ve got three recipes that breathe new life into classic comfort and warm-weather food favorites. Then, we’ll take a look at two instances of insidious white supremacy functioning in very different venues, and a newly launched intersectional vegan zine that I want to distribute on every sidewalk corner on my college campus. Onward!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

“I’m-On-Cloud-9” Dreamy Vegan Mashed Potatoes
via Blissful Basil

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Pairing potatoes with cashews and cauliflower, Ashley at Blissful Basil has created what appears as the most luscious iteration of mashed potatoes at which my mouth has ever watered. Plus, see if you can guess the secret ingredient…

Sweet

How to Make Coconut Oil Pie Crust
via Oh, Ladycakes

Photo via Ashlae at Oh, Ladycakes.

Photo via Ashlae at Oh, Ladycakes.

Pie crust recipes generally tend to intimidate me a bit, but Ashlae’s accessible, clearly laid out directions for flaky pastry dough based in the most richly aromatic oil in all of Oil Land makes me want to jump right into the kitchen.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Tempeh Chili
adapted from The Post Punk Kitchen

Photo via Jugalbandi.

Photo via Jugalbandi.

This past week served as the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC)‘s big ol’ campus event week themed around government repression of animal rights and environmental activists (titled “The Terrorization of Dissent” after the recently released anthology by Lantern Books). For our first lecture of the week’s three-part series, editor of the anthology Jason Del Gandio gave an engaging and dynamic talk while the audience gobbled up spoonfuls of this, perhaps the most flavorful, heartiest, most pleasantly textured chili I’ve ever made. With vegan cookbook genius Isa Chandra Moskowitz behind the recipe, how could I have expected anything less?

Must-Read News Story

The Minstrelsy of Marketing
via William C. Anderson at Truthout

Photo via Denny's Twitter account.

Photo via Denny’s Twitter account.

An illuminating look into a pervasive intersection of capitalism and racism, this article by freelance writer William C. Anderson clearly demonstrates the default mode of U.S. society to commodify Blackness and Black bodies – a mode that certainly didn’t die out with the abolition of slavery.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

The FBI vs. Martin Luther King: Inside J. Edgar Hoover’s ‘Suicide Letter’ to Civil Rights Leader
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

On the topic of state repression of activists, the newly released full text of this horrifying letter from J. Edgar Hoover to Martin Luther King Jr. – in which the former assumes the identity of a Black activist urging Dr. King to kill himself – highlights the long history of the U.S. government to target social justice activists who pose threats to existing hierarchies of domination.

Book Recommendation

Project Intersect, Issue One: Clarion Call
edited by Jacqueline Morr

Photo via Project Intersect

Photo via Project Intersect

Encouraging “radical intersectional analyses of oppression that are sorely needed both in activist circles and in general public discourse,” the newly launched Project Intersect zine embodies exactly the direction toward which I hope with all my heart the future of the animal liberation movement points. I enthusiastically urge you to order your copy. Like, immediately.

In solidarity, Ali.