Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-20-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Enjoy the sweet raw treats, a unique take on a ubiquitous dip, a local tempeh purveyor, three organizations promoting the accessibility of holistic healthcare, a podcast episode on transgender rights, and feminist modernist literature on the third installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

The vegan blogosphere offered much too many tantalizing recipes in this past week, so I’ve allowed myself to cheat a bit and feature two of my favorite newly published recipes, one sweet and one savory, on this round of News & Chews. Somehow, I don’t think that you, dear readers, will mind.

Sweet
Raw Hazelnut Brownies with Pistachio Cream Topping
via The Vegan Woman

mouthwatering-halva-brownies

Photo via The Vegan Woman.

These gorgeously earth-toned brownies manage to combine my two favorite nuts on earth (the holy hazelnut and the pristine pistachio) in a decadent, nourishing raw dessert that features both silky smooth and crunchy textures. Intriguingly, the brownie base even packs a secret veggie punch—the frequent salad star that this dessert employs backstage will certainly surprise you. An important note: don’t forget to use Food Empowerment Project-approved cocoa powder or, better yet, carob powder in order to avoid supporting the exploitative chocolate trade.

Savory
5-Minute Microwave Hummus
via Minimalist Baker

BEST-EVER-5-Minute-Microwave-Hummus-The-trick-that-gives-you-creamy-restaurant-style-hummus-every-time.-I-cant-sotp-eating-it-vegan-glutenfree

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

While I’m sure that the vast majority of you have consumed your fair share of hummus over the course of your lifetime, I find myself consistently transfixed by recipes that claim to yield the “best hummus ever” due to a unique preparation method. For example, I’ve seen directions to peel each individual chickpea before blending, and to puree the hummus in the blender rather than the food processor (the latter instruction actually did result in some of the creamiest, dreamiest hummus I’d tasted in a great while). This particular hummus, promised as “the best” by a blog that I find to be a quite reputable source, suggests microwaving the chickpeas in their cooking or canning liquid together with whole cloves of garlic before pureeing the mixture with a generous helping of tahini. Well folks, I’m preliminarily convinced, and I look forward to experimenting with this new hummus method.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Chipotle Citrus Tempeh & Broccoli with Barry’s Brooklyn Tempeh
adapted from Vegan Richa

Photo via Vegan Richa.

Photo via Vegan Richa.

This hearty one-dish meal has caught my eye nearly every time I’ve scrolled through my extensive “Recipes to Try” Word document, and the fresh broccoli at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket last Saturday finally spurred me to make it. A pleasing harmony between sweet and spicy, the sauce packs a flavor punch with freshly squeezed orange juice and chipotles in adobo. Even better, the sauce employs a starch (I used arrowroot) to achieve a sticky texture that coats the broccoli and tempeh in glossy goodness.

While the complexity and viscosity of the sauce verily impressed me, the highlight of this dish doesn’t even make an appearance in the original recipe. Indeed, Barry’s tempeh (local to Brooklyn) outshined all of the ingredients and the sum of their parts; I found myself forking around the broccoli for all of the crispy-fried cubes of naturally sweet, chewy Azuki Bean & Brown Rice Tempeh (one of four unorthodox flavors of Barry’s). If you’re lucky enough to live in the NY area, I’d highly recommend that you get your tempeh-loving paws on some Barry’s.

 Must-Read News Article

by Liz Pleasant, via Truthout
Photo via the Healing Clinic Collective.

Photo via the Healing Clinic Collective.

I recently featured the amazing work of activist and yogi Becky Thompson on the ol’ blog, and the initiatives highlighted in this article over at Truthout certainly align with Becky’s important mission of making yoga and other forms of powerful holistic healing accessible to all, regardless of race or class. The article features the commendable groups the Healing Clinic Collective (an Oakland-based organization that hosts events with free holistic healthcare, and offers discounted rates for future appointments), the Third-Root Community Health Center (a Brooklyn-based project that provides holistic health services at a sliding-scale rate, and reaches out to low-income communities), and the Samarya Center (a Seattle-based group that uses the profits from its yoga studio to bring physical therapy to impoverished communities). In my view, these sorts of collective, accessibility-generating endeavors form the base of a robust movement against our destructive and unequal capitalist system. Check out these organizations for some real hope.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Janet Mock on transgender rights, Mychal Denzel Smith on war, Tupac, and Ninja Turtles
via Citizen Radio

Citizen Radio hosts Jamie Kilstein & Allison Kilkenny with Janet Mock. Photo via Citizen Radio.

Citizen Radio hosts Jamie Kilstein & Allison Kilkenny with Janet Mock. Photo via Citizen Radio.

When it comes to discussing and acting upon social issues, so often transgender equality gets excluded and ignored, even by so-called LGBT organizations (where’s consideration for the “T,” people?!?). This exclusion becomes particularly troublesome when considering the fact that individuals of trans experience—especially those who are also women of color—deal with intense physical and systemic violence on a daily basis.

In this interview with powerhouse activist and author of Redefining Realness, Janet Mock discusses these issues and more with the hilarious duo of progressive radio Jamie Kilstein and Allison Kilkenny. The most striking moment in the interview for me came when Janet touched upon “safe spaces,” the notion that we can carve out spaces within communities, groups, organizations, etc. in which individuals of all backgrounds and experiences can feel safe expressing their viewpoints without fear of marginalization. Of safe spaces, Janet offers these important thoughts:

“These spaces, even though they’re supposed to be welcoming, safe spaces, they still are infected by the ills that all other spaces are —racism and misogyny and elitism and classism, academia jargon and all of this stuff. These spaces aren’t immune. If you come into these spaces knowing that, then your job is to come in and make it a better space.”

We can’t just assume that because we define a space as “safe,” that oppression can’t happen within that space. With this in mind, we must work to consciously and meaningfully honor the voices of those most often marginalized.

Book Recommendation

To the Lighthouse
by Virginia Woolf

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This week, I found myself with a work of fiction in hand—one authored by one of the greatest modernist writers of the 20th century. Though I usually prefer to examine social issues directly through critical non-fiction, sometimes I find it refreshing to engage with the profound ideas that concern our modern world (in this case, feminism and gender inequality) through a filter of gorgeously crafted sentences and expertly developed characters. Enter Virginia Woolf, whose To the Lighthouse provides an ideal novel into which to disappear while still confronting the important issues of our (and Woolf’s!) time.

Until next time, Ali.

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