Vegan MoFo #2: Moroccan-Spiced Slaw, Cheezy Rosemary Roasted Chickpeas, & Aromatic Millet

vegan mofo 2013

Though yesterday’s first Vegan MoFo post regaled my summer internship antics during the month of June, today I’m pleased to introduce you all, dear readers, to the theme of the rest of September’s posts: Ferry dinners. As longtime readers will know, at the start of the spring semester last year I moved into an on-campus vegetarian co-op known as Ferry House, where 21 Vassar students share nightly vegan meals; discuss profoundly important issues related to class, race, gender, the environment, food, animals, and so much more; and seek to live in the most socially conscious, environmentally sustainable manner possible. You can read about Ferry in further detail in this previous post.

As I mentioned, every night two Ferries team up to cook a hearty vegan dinner for their housemates. Unpredictable, creative, and always scrumptious, Ferry dinners provide a convivial atmosphere in which to bond with housemates and reenergize for the potentially busy night ahead (we are in college, after all). Prompted by a number of readers interested in both the food and community of Ferry, I’ve decided to feature our eminent dinners during this year’s Vegan MoFo.

My dinner plate from last night's Ferry meal.

My dinner plate from last night’s Ferry meal.

The last meal before classes begin, last night’s dinner brought nearly all of Ferry together at our humungous dining room table in boisterous, joyful union. Since we haven’t yet determined the dinner cooking schedule, I happily volunteered to cook. Though all of my housemates always express their genuine gratitude whenever I offer to cook dinner or unexpectedly provide the house with sweet treats, I honestly wish that I could devote more time to providing my cherished Ferries with nourishment, for I view doing so as an utmost act of love (not to mention activism for those Ferries who have not yet adopted a vegan diet).

Moroccan-spiced slaw.

Moroccan-spiced slaw.

Last night’s dinner featured a simple slaw, inspired by Sarah of My New Roots, of Napa cabbage, shredded carrots, fresh dill, raisins, and toasted almonds in a Moroccan-spiced dressing; a generous batch of home-cooked chickpeas (no canned beans in Ferry!) roasted in olive oil, nutritional yeast (we keep a 10-lb bin of nooch in the refrigerator at all times), and rosemary from our own plant (inspired by this tried-and-true recipe; and millet prepared in the house’s rice cooker with bay leaves, paprika, and tamari.

Cheezy rosemary chickpeas.

Cheezy rosemary chickpeas.

Preparing meals for a relatively large number of people requires a bit of practice, especially in terms of determining the amounts of each ingredient. To give you a general idea, the slaw required two heads of cabbage, six large carrots, a whole bunch of dill, two cups each of almonds and raisins, and about three-quarters of a cup of dressing; the chickpeas required four cups of dry beans, six tablespoons of olive oil, half a cup of nooch, and a big ol’ handful of fresh rosemary; and the millet required four cups of millet and a generous sprinkling of each spice.

Millet pilaf.

Millet pilaf.

Unfortunately, since we haven’t gone grocery shopping in about three days, our refrigerator lacks fresh produce…so stay tuned for an inventive dinner in tomorrow’s post!

Until next time, Ali.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Vegan MoFo #2: Moroccan-Spiced Slaw, Cheezy Rosemary Roasted Chickpeas, & Aromatic Millet

    • Ali Seiter says:

      Sure! For the chickpeas, I cooked 4 cups of dried chickpeas, tossed them with 6 tbsp of olive oil, 1/2 cup of nooch, and a large handful of fresh rosemary, then roasted them at 350 for about 45 minutes. For the salad, I basically followed the recipe from My New Roots that I linked to. For the millet, I cooked 4 cups of dried millet in a rice cooker with large sprinkled of bay leaves, paprika, and tamari.

      As for keeping nooch in the fridge, Ferry does it simply because the container it comes in says to keep it in there!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s