Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-28-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote vegan food (an outgrowth of anti-speciesism) and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as important in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hello, all! Ready for another installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)? Good, because for this week’s recipes I’m sharing with ya’ll some well-spiced eggplant bites, a unique and oh-so-summery ice cream, and an easy way to eat up lots of cabbage. For stories, I’ve got an article lambasting Peter Singer’s utilitarian philosophy (because you really can’t have too many), a documentary on the continuing response to Hurricane Katrina, and an important book in the progressive education canon. No commentary on these ones from me today, folks–I’ve gotta go pack up my life in Madison to return to school in New York. Catch ya later!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Eggplant Meatballs with Za’atar & Kale Pesto
Via The First Mess

Photo via Laura Wright.

Photo via Laura Wright.

Sweet

Vanilla-Maple Sweet Corn Ice Cream
Via Fragrant Vanilla Cake

Photo via Amy Lyons.

Photo via Amy Lyons.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Rice Bowl with Sweet-and-Sour Purple Cabbage & Tofu
Via Martha Rose Shulman at The New York Times

Photo via Andrew Scrivani.

Photo via Andrew Scrivani.

Must-Read Article(s)

Against Charity
By Matthew Snow at Jacobin

Angelina Jolie visits refugees in 2012. UNHCR / Flickr

Angelina Jolie visits refugees in 2012. UNHCR / Flickr

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

New Orleans: Recovery or Removal?
Via The Laura Flanders Show at Truthout

Photo via The Laura Flanders Show.

Photo via The Laura Flanders Show.

Book Recommendation

More Than a Score: The New Uprising Against High-Stakes Testing
By Jesse Hagopian at Haymarket Books

Photo via Haymarket Books.

Photo via Haymarket Books.

In solidarity, Ali.

Lifestyle Politics Won’t Bring Revolution: Veganism is Not Nearly Enough

Hi, all! So I talk a lot about how vegan consumption habits constitute a mere extension of my broader politics of radical anti-capitalism, anti-speciesism, anti-racism, and feminism. Consuming vegan goods hardly constitutes a revolutionary act in and of itself; in fact, I think that believing it does plays right into a capitalist discourse of “purchasing power” and individualism. It’s this belief — which we can call “lifestyle politics” — that I want to discuss and challenge in this post.

What is lifestyle politics? As I understand the term, it stems from an anarchist philosophy of “prefigurative politics”: a belief that in order to work toward the society in which we want to live, we must “build forms of organization today that prefigure the future society” (D’Amato, Feb. 2009). Taking a page from the second-wave feminist book, proponents of lifestyle politics uphold the assertion that “the personal is political,” and attempt “to incorporate their political philosophy into the minute activities of everyday life” (Portwood-Stacer). As you can probably tell, vegan consumption certainly fits under the banner of lifestyle politics, along with environmentally-minded actions like taking shorter showers, and the oft-encouraged process of “checking one’s privilege.”

Of course, nothing is wrong with any of these actions, and they almost always come with positive intent. However, basing one’s politics upon these individual lifestyle actions does a couple of things: 1.) Obscures the necessity of revolutionary organizing. 2.) Perpetuates an individualistic understanding of the world. 3.) Upholds the capitalist rhetoric of “consumer power.”

From a radical socialist perspective, societal change can only come when the workers of the world unite and rise up against the ruling class that systemically exploits the earth and all of its inhabitants in the name of constant profit accumulation. Organizing toward this goal constitutes a political strategy that will bring about the collective liberation we all want to see, and depends upon collaboration with fellow members of the working class.

In contrast, lifestyle politics — instead of calling for exploited peoples to unite against systemic oppression — encourages individuals to opt out (or rather, attempt to opt out) of those systems rather than confronting them, to distance themselves from those around them who are still engaging in “problematic behaviors.” Far from fostering solidarity among oppressed peoples, lifestyle politics can easily animate a “holier than thou,” “me vs. the world” understanding of society in which we begin to demonize individuals as moral failures for acting in certain ways (mostly in ways related to consumption habits), instead of realizing and confronting the larger power structures and systems that condition people’s actions. Indeed, as Poelker notes, within a “personal is political” rhetoric, “[w]e seem to have forgotten that the structural is also political” (emphasis in original).

So, instead of necessitating a collectively determined — based upon a systemic analysis of society’s ills — the best strategy for rising up and winning a struggle against the ruling classes, lifestyle politics concerns itself primarily with “commodity activism” and making “ethical” consumer decisions. Under lifestyle politics, we believe that by buying or boycotting certain goods — an individualized and capitalistic tactic — we can solve a collective problem.

But this is exactly how those in power want us to think. Williams explains further: “If we subscribe to lifestyle politics we then see ourselves exactly as corporate and political elites want us to see ourselves—as consumers. This is not where our power lies. It allows capitalism to go on as before, with more and more environmental damage and pollution, while we are lulled into believing we’re actually doing something.” In fact, lifestyle activism developed specifically to function within the confines of neoliberal capitalism, as the more revolutionary-minded movements of the 1960s and ’70s were on the decline (Poelker). Lifestyle politics, in other words, is designed precisely to not dismantle the very power structures that we fool ourselves into thinking we’re fighting against.

This is all absolutely not to say that I don’t think that every human who is logistically able to do so should practice vegan consumption habits. That would certainly be a enormous shift in the right direction. However, taking that step cannot be where our activism ends. We must not fool ourselves into thinking that getting more vegan options at restaurants, crowdfunding the next innovative vegan company, or buying a new brand of vegan cheese will even make a dent in the capitalist system that constantly infringes upon the bodily autonomy of all beings, human and non. As I’ve asserted many times before, vegan consumption is a mere outgrowth, what I see as a logical extension, of a radical politics that includes anti-speciesism.

So yeah, let’s keep buying our vegan cheese (if we can), but let’s not kid ourselves into believing that doing so is a revolutionary act. Let’s be real revolutionaries. Let’s organize. Let’s undertake a systemic analysis of society’s ills. Let’s learn about the history of struggle for labor, women’s rights, civil rights, LGBTQ rights, indigenous rights, and beyond. Let’s understand that anti-speciesism and all other forms of oppression won’t be eradicated until we move beyond capitalism. Let’s do this all and more, and let’s do it collectively, united, together.

In solidarity, Ali.


Resources

Allen, Emma. “Lifestyle politics, good intentions, and the road to hell.” Freedom Socialist: Voice of Revolutionary Feminism. December 2010. Web. 18 August 2015.

Bennett, W. Lance. “Branded Political Communication: Lifestyle Politics, Logo Campaigns, and the Rise of Global Citizenship.” Chapter in Michele Micheletti, Andreas Follesdal, and Dietlind Stolle. The Politics Behind Products. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, forthcoming.

D’Amato, Paul. “How do anarchists see change happening?” SocialistWorker.org. 26 March 2009, Issue 693. Web. 18 August 2015.

–. “Refusing to be ruled over.” SocialistWorker.org. 27 February 2009, Issue 691. Web. 18 August 2015.

International Socialist Review. “Anarchism: How Not to Make a Revolution.” International Socialist Review. N. dat., n. pag. Web. 18 August 2015.

Lewis, Tom. “Empire strikes out.” International Socialist Review 24 (July-August 2002): n. pag. Web. 18 August 2015.

Muldoon, Amy. “Let them eat (organic) cake.” SocialistWorker.org. 31 August 2009. Web. 18 August 2015.

Poelker, Ryne. “Does it help to ‘check privilege’?” SocialistWorker.org. 15 October 2013. Web. 18 August 2015.

Portwood-Stacer, Laura. Lifestyle Politics and Radical Activism. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. Web. 18 August 2015.

Williams, Chris. “Marxism and the environment.” International Socialist Review 72 (July 2010): n. pag. Web. 18 August 2015.

Z, Mickey. “Lifestyle Changes (Like Going Vegan) Won’t End Capitalism.” World News Trust. 12 April 2015. Web. 20 August 2015.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-21-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote vegan food (an outgrowth of anti-speciesism) and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as important in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hey there, folks! Welcome to the 62nd (wow…) edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews). This one will take care of all your colorful-and-hearty salad needs, then will touch upon homelessness and racism in relation to speciesism before sharing with ya’ll a media library chock full of revolutionary talks on important social issues. Happy Friday!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Israeli Couscous Salad with Burnt Citrus Dressing
Via Quite Good Food

Photo via Amber at Quite Good Food.

Photo via Amber at Quite Good Food.

I’m super intrigued by the process employed in this recipe of roasting lemons and oranges before making a dressing out of their juices — it certainly upholds my theory that just about anything tastes better after a trip in the oven for some caramelization. After you take a gander at the recipe, why don’t you hop on over to Electronic Intifada to get the latest on the Israeli genocide against Palestinians? (What, you really thought I was going to feature a recipe that uses Israeli couscous without reminding ya’ll about its country of origin?)

Sweet

Blondie Crisps
Via Bittersweet Blog

Photo via Hannah Kaminsky.

Photo via Hannah Kaminsky.

If you’re anything like me, you jump for the crispy-chewy-gooey corner pieces in any batch of brownies or blondies. Leave it to vegan baker extraordinaire Hannah Kaminsky to craft a blondie recipe that produces only those ideal edge pieces, and in the form of a cookie, no less! Magic.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Curried Sweet Potatoes & Broccoli with Cashews & Raisins
Via 86 Lemons

Photo via Livvy at 86 Lemons.

Photo via Livvy at 86 Lemons.

Veggie-packed salads with crunchy nuts, chewy dried fruit, and creamy mayo-based dressings never fail to please me. And this one certainly didn’t fail to please my housemates, either! Everyone scarfed down this salad at dinner this past Monday, leaving no leftovers to speak of.

Must-Read Article(s)

Homelessness is the crime, not the homeless
By Allen Arthur at SocialistWorker.org

Photo via SocialistWorker.org.

Photo via SocialistWorker.org.

Homelessness and the criminalization of homeless people has been at the forefront of my mind lately, since my hometown has recently taken action against Madison’s homeless population, such as by removing from a downtown street the decorative rocks that homeless individuals would sit and sleep on. This article gives a great overview of similar measures taken all over the U.S., as well as the reasons — rooted in capitalist white supremacy — why municipalities enact such measures.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

The Problem with Appropriating Speciesism-Black Oppression Representations
By Liz Ross at Sistah Vegan

Photo via Sistah Vegan.

Photo via Sistah Vegan.

This video from the 2015 Sistah Vegan Conference features keynote Liz Ross speaking about racism and white supremacy within vegan circles, why we cannot directly compare manifestations of racism to those of speciesism, and how to connect racism and speciesism in ways that do not perpetuate a long, violent history of comparing Black people and non-human animals in order to demonize the former.

Book Recommendation Awesome Projects You Should Totally Check Out

WeAreMany.org
Via the Center for Economic Research and Social Change

Photo via WeAreMany.org.

Photo via WeAreMany.org.

This website is a veritable treasure trove of radical voices calling for all those who face oppression in the world to organize together against injustice. Most of the audio and video come from the annual Socialism conferences, dating back to 2009. I have been listening to these nonstop, and feel invigorated after each one.

In solidarity, Ali.

Against “#AllLivesMatter”

Welcome to the week, ya’ll! Thanks for the positive feedback on last week’s post about the origins of the Black feminist praxis of intersectionality. Stellar activist Pax Ahimsa Gethen provided what I think is a great suggestion to use the term “kyriarchy” when discussing intersecting forms of oppression, so as not to erase the particular struggles that Black women face by throwing around the word “intersectionality.” Be sure to check out Pax’s blog for more important insights on racism, gender, and speciesism.

Today I want to discuss another issue of racial erasure, this time regarding the “whitewashed sentiment” of All Lives Matter. Being tuned into a community of race- and class-privileged proponents of veganism who continue to assert that All Lives Matter in terms of non-human animals, I see this racial microaggression pop up in my social media feeds on a fairly regular basis. In this post, I’m really just passing along the information that innumerable Black people have emphasized since All Lives Matter first popped up, with a particular intended audience of Animal Whites Activists.

Okay, solidarity work, right? To me, working in solidarity with others means understanding the unique circumstances that those others face, listening to what those others are asking of you, and not co-opting their experiences to fit your own agenda. Even though we’re all caught up in the same systems of oppression (capitalism, heteropatriarchy, white supremacy), those systems affect particular people in particular ways.

All Lives Matter erases this particularity, which in turn accomplishes two things: 1.) De-emphasizes the systemic police brutality that plagues Black communities almost exclusively (check out this article by Julia Craven for detailed facts and figures on this). 2.) Re-centers whiteness in conversations about race, thus positioning white people as racially oppressed beings and thus without responsibility for confronting white supremacy.

With these effects, All Lives Matter functions in diametric opposition with solidarity work, since it ignores the unique forms of oppression that Black people face, refuses to acknowledge what Black people are asking of us white people, and co-opts the struggle against police-on-Black violence in order to excuse us white people from actively working to dismantle systemic racism. Reddit user GeekAesthete explains the situation particularly succinctly:

Imagine that you’re sitting down to dinner with your family, and while everyone else gets a serving of the meal, you don’t get any. So you say “I should get my fair share.” And as a direct response to this, your dad corrects you, saying, “everyone should get their fair share.” Now, that’s a wonderful sentiment — indeed, everyone should, and that was kinda your point in the first place: that you should be a part of everyone, and you should get your fair share also. However, dad’s smart-ass comment just dismissed you and didn’t solve the problem that you still haven’t gotten any!

The problem is that the statement “I should get my fair share” had an implicit “too” at the end: “I should get my fair share, too, just like everyone else.” But your dad’s response treated your statement as though you meant “only I should get my fair share”, which clearly was not your intention. As a result, his statement that “everyone should get their fair share,” while true, only served to ignore the problem you were trying to point out.

That’s the situation of the “black lives matter” movement. Culture, laws, the arts, religion, and everyone else repeatedly suggest that all lives should matter. Clearly, that message already abounds in our society.

When proponents of veganism use All Lives Matter in an effort to emphasize the species-based oppression faced by non-human animals, we are engaging in that same ignoring, that same refusal to acknowledge, that same co-optation. We are playing Oppression Olympics, challenging Black Lives Matter because we believe that Black people are stealing the spotlight from non-human animals, whom we see as a “more oppressed” class.

If we claim to be so worried about understanding oppressions as interconnected, then why on earth would we push back against a movement devoted to dismantling one of those forms of oppression? Why on earth would we feel threatened by that movement if we’re all working toward collective liberation, but just in different ways which take into account the unique struggles faced by certain peoples?

This pushing back, this threatened feeling — this is exactly how the ruling classes want us to act and feel. Their ability to wield and maintain power depends upon dividing us so that we cannot unite against them. By essentially competing instead of working in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, All Lives Matter plays right into the hands of those responsible for the oppression and exploitation of those not in power.

So. Fellow white people. Let’s stop centering ourselves and start working in solidarity. Let’s stop getting defensive and start acting self-reflectively. Let’s stop this All Lives Matter nonsense.

In solidarity, Ali.


References

Black Millennials. “What You Mean By #AllLivesMatter.” Black Millennials. 1 December 2014. Web. 11 August 2015.

Craven, Julia. “Please Stop Telling Me That All Lives Matter.” Huffington Post. 25 January 2015. Web. 11 August 2015.

Harper, Dr. Amie Breeze. “Dear Post-Racial White Vegans: ‘All Lives Matter’ Is a Racial Microaggression Contributing to Our Daily Struggle with Racial Battle Fatigue.” The Sistah Vegan Project. 13 January 2015. Web. 11 August 2015.

Roose, Kevin. “The next time someone says ‘all lives matter,’ show them these 5 paragraphs.” Fusion. 21 July 2015. Web. 11 August 2015.

Yancy, George and Judith Butler. “What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’?” The New York Times. 12 January 2015. Web. 11 August 2015.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-14-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote vegan food (an outgrowth of anti-speciesism) and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as important in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

One-Pot Cheesy Tomato & Broccoli Pasta
Via Ceara’s Kitchen

Photo via Ceara at Ceara's Kitchen.

Photo via Ceara at Ceara’s Kitchen.

I’m super enthusiastic about the idea of sticking a bunch of yummy stuff into a pot, covering it up, and opening it after a couple of minutes to find a completed dish. And when that dish involves toothsome pasta, tender broccoli, and juicy tomatoes in a noochy, herby sauce…even better.

Sweet

Frosted Walnut Cake
Via Wallflower Girl

Photo via Aimee Ryan.

Photo via Aimee Ryan.

Frosted cake is perhaps my favorite dessert. What’s not to love about moist, light baked goods coated in creamy sweet goop? This recipe features nutty cake encased in an aquafaba-infused frosting.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Waffled Zucchini “Parmesan” Fritters
Adapted from Food52

Photo via Alpha Smoot.

Photo via Alpha Smoot.

Okay, so I really adapted this recipe. Egg=flaxseed meal, milk=non-dairy milk, parmesan=ground almonds + nutritional yeast, all-purpose flour=whole wheat flour, waffles=pancakes. But hey, they still turned out deliciously!

Must-Read Article(s)

24 Actions You NEED to Take to Help Trans Women of Color Survive
By Lexi Adsit at Autostraddle

Miss Major, prominent trans activist who served as a primary player in the Stonewall Uprising. / Photo via Outside the Frame.

Miss Major, prominent trans activist who served as a primary player in the Stonewall Uprising and who is featured in the film “Major!” / Photo via Outside the Frame.

What with the inexcusable number of trans women of color killed since the beginning of this year, the blatant whitewashing of the new Stonewall movie, and the countless institutional barriers trans people face to adequate healthcare, housing, and more, this article could not be more important.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

pattrice jones at the 2015 National Animal Rights Conference
Via Stacey B on YouTube

Photo via Stacey B on YouTube.

Photo via Stacey B on YouTube.

So the annual National Animal Rights Conference happened two weekends ago. I was not there, but activist extraordinaire pattrice jones of VINE Sanctuary was! The Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC) had the immense privilege of welcoming her to campus last semester, so I can say from experience that seeing her speak is a real, thought-provoking treat. In this “New Directions for Animal Advocacy” plenary, pattrice speaks about taking a more kyriarchy-focused approach to animal activism

Book Recommendation Awesome Projects You Should Totally Check Out

Aphro-Ism
Via Aph & Syl Ko

Photo via Aph & Syl Ko.

Photo via Aph & Syl Ko.

Hey remember that Our Hen House podcast episode I hosted where I interview Aph Ko about kyrarichy-focused animal activism? Remember how awesome Aph Ko is? Yeah, it’s pretty hard to forget. Which is why it’s sososososo exciting that Aph and her sister Syl have launched a new blog that focuses on black feminism, veganism, animals, and anti-racism. I suggest that ya’ll subscribe to it immediately.

In solidarity, Ali.

On the Roots of Intersectionality

Hi, folks! So it’s been a hot second since Episode 285 of the Our Hen House podcast aired, in which I interviewed Hana LowAph Ko, and Jaqueline Morr on the importance of intersectionality in anti-speciesist activism. In my intro with my good friend Kaden, we briefly discuss the origins of the praxis (theory + practice) of intersectionality, but I want to further emphasize those origins here, since they often get lost in a white-dominated rhetoric of social justice activism (as emphasized in this important essay by Dr. C. Michele Martindill on the Vegan Feminist Network blog, which I would highly recommend to all y’all).

In my experience, many conversations among white activists employ intersectionality as a buzzword of sorts, a trendy thing to “do” that will further one’s own reputation as an activist. This phenomenon is pretty predictable, seeing as white supremacy functions to center whiteness and white people in every situation, especially when it comes to talking credit for the ideas and practices of people of color. As such, when we white activists refer to our activism as “intersectional” without understanding the original meaning of the term, we are upholding the very system of white supremacy that we purport to struggle against.

So. Intersectionality. Black legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw first coined the term in her 1989 essay entitled “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine,” proposing intersectionality as a theory and practice of understanding the way multiple oppressions – specifically, racism and sexism – are experienced. Crenshaw uses the following description of a street intersection to illustrate the concept:

“Consider an analogy to traffic in an intersection, coming and going in all four directions. Discrimination, like traffic through an intersection, may flow in one direction, and it may flow in another. If an accident happens in an intersection, it can be caused by cars traveling from any number of directions and, sometimes, from all of them. Similarly, if a Black woman is harmed because she is in an intersection, her injury could result from sex discrimination or race discrimination. . . . But it is not always easy to reconstruct an accident: Sometimes the skid marks and the injuries simply indicate that they occurred simultaneously, frustrating efforts to determine which driver caused the harm.”

As part of this lived experience of multiple oppressions, Black women also tend to be invisibilized in analyses of gender oppression and racism, since the former prioritizes white women while the latter prioritizes Black men. Think of White feminism, for example, described by Cate at BattyMamzelle as “a set of beliefs that allows for the exclusion of issues that specifically affect women of color. It is ‘one size-fits all’ feminism, where middle class White women are the mold that others must fit. It is a method of practicing feminism, not an indictment of every individual White feminist, everywhere, always” (qtd. in Uwujaren and Utt).

Of course, Crenshaw was not the first to experience and recognize the multiple oppressions faced by Black women. Indeed, since the days of plantation slavery in the U.S., Black women have described their lived realities under systems of white supremacy and patriarchy with such terms as “interlocking oppressions,” “simultaneous oppressions,” “double jeopardy,” and the like (Smith). Think, for example, of Sojourner Truth’s 1851 “Ain’t I a Woman?” speech, which describes the disparate treatment of Black and white women in 19th-century United States.

As you can see, intersectionality developed as a way to understand the particular experiences of Black women, oppressed under intersecting systems of white supremacy and patriarchy. So, when we call our activism “intersectional,” we are claiming that we are working to dismantle those two systems (perhaps among others), which we understand as being interconnected. We cannot use the term “intersectional” to describe activism that connects any and all forms of oppression, because to do so erases the specific experiences of Black women in order to uphold a white-centric narrative of social justice.

Additionally, we white activists cannot call ourselves “intersectional.” As Black feminist scholar Patricia Hill Collins notes, those with power in systems of white supremacy and patriarchy cannot claim to “be intersectional,” since we do not live as the people by and for whom the concept was developed (i.e., Black women). We can strive for our activism to incorporate an intersectional understanding of white supremacy and patriarchy, but we ourselves cannot “be intersectional.”

In a time when intersectionality has become a buzzword and a trend, I think it’s of supreme importance to remember, honor, and act on the Black feminist origins of the praxis. For more information on the topic, check out the (few among many others out there) References I’ve included below.

In solidarity, Ali.


References

Crenshaw, Kimberle. “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.” University of Chicago Legal Forum 139 (1989): 139-168. Web. Hein Online. 9 August 2015.

—. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color.” Stanford Law Review 43 (1993): 1241-1299. Web. 9 August 2015.

Martindill, Dr. C. Michele. “Lessons in White Fragility: When Vegan Abolitionists Appropriate Intersectionality.” Vegan Feminist Network. 6 May 2015. Web. 9 August 2015.

Smith, Sharon. “Black Feminism and Intersectionality.” International Socialist Review 91 (July 2013): n. pag. Web. 9 August 2015.

Uwujaren, Jarune and Jamie Utt. “Why Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional (And 3 Ways to Practice It).” Everyday Feminism. 11 January 2015. Web. 9 August 2015.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-7-15}

Chickpeas & Changes’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote vegan food (an outgrowth of anti-speciesism) and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which I view as important in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Just a reminder about the exciting news that Chickpeas & Change is now accepting submissions! I’m thrilled to be able to open this space up to voices from the anti-speciesist, feminist, anti-racist community. Check out this page for submission guidelines.

Hello, everyone! Hope ya’ll are well and ready for another edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews). Today’s recipes boast a varied mix of veggies, peanut buttery decadence, and toothsome, protein-rich yums. As for stories, gear up to read and hear all about the continued colonialism represented in the Puerto Rican debt crisis, discrepancies between reform and revolution, and the links between socialism and sexuality. Onward!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Roasted Vegetable Quinoa with Tahini Dressing
Via Harriet Emily

Photo via Harriet Emily.

Photo via Harriet Emily.

Some of my favorite veggies (sweet potatoes, kale, green peas) prepared in my favorite style (roasted) and tossed in a dressing redolent of my favorite flavor (tangy)? Count me in on this rainbow of a dish.

Sweet

Peanut Butter S’Mores Parfaits
Via The Frosted Vegan

Photo via Abby at The Frosted Vegan.

Photo via Abby at The Frosted Vegan.

Nope, I still haven’t tired of all this aquafaba enthusiasm, especially when the meringue-able bean liquid is featured atop a bowl of creamy, sweet, chocolate-peanut buttery goodness. I mean really, can you blame me?

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Chickpea Cutlets
Via Veganomicon (Recipe on The Post Punk Kitchen)

Photo via Isa Chandra Moskowitz.

Photo via Isa Chandra Moskowitz.

So this past Monday my housemate and I prepared a fancy French-inspired multi-course vegan meal for our fellow housemates, and our main course consisted of these infamous chickpea cutlets from vegan cookbook magician Isa Chandra Moskowitz. The verdict? My housemates could not stop asking me for the recipe, and demanded that I never leave the house (too bad I’m moving out in August!). So yeah, serve these to ya’ll’s friends.

Must-Read Article(s)

Puerto Rico’s economic ‘death spiral’ can be helped if Washington allows the island to declare bankruptcy
By Juan Gonzalez at New York Daily News

With unemployment over 12% and thousands of citizens fleeing to the mainland U.S., Puerto Rico is set up to be in serious economic trouble for years to come. / Photo via The Washington Post.

With unemployment over 12% and thousands of citizens fleeing to the mainland U.S., Puerto Rico is set up to be in serious economic trouble for years to come. / Photo via The Washington Post.

In this article Democracy Now! co-host Juan Gonzalez lays out the U.S. political posturing behind Puerto Rico’s economic crisis and, importantly, connects that crisis to this country’s vast history of colonialism. Read the article, then watch this clip from Democracy Now! for more info.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Chepe on Social Movements and Revolution
Via Radio Dispatch

In this episode of the Radio Dispatch podcast, radical activist Chepe discusses a topic that is often on my mind: what sorts of actions will lead us toward the society in which we want to live, the one that affords us all collective liberation? Should we throw out reforms altogether, in favor of total, immediate revolution? Should we support non-revolutionary actors (i.e., Bernie Sanders) in our struggle toward revolution? Chepe touches upon these questions and more in this riveting episode.

Book Recommendation

Sexuality and Socialism: History, Politics, and the Theory of LGBTQ Liberation
By Sherry Wolf

Photo via Haymarket Books.

Photo via Haymarket Books.

Recommended to me by my ISO-member friend, this book by feminist activist powerhouse Sherry Wolf (omg watch her videos she’s incrediblefeatures essays on the roots of LGBT oppression, the construction of sexual and gender identities, and how to win sexual liberation for all. Good stuff, ya’ll.

In solidarity, Ali.